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Shown are three stages to lowering the convertible top of a 1980-’82 Mustang CABRIO by Automobili Intermeccanica, and the hard hatch cover that hid the fabric roof. Pictured in the lower image are the subframe tubing and steel plate, plus steel rods inside the windshield frame, all of which added strength when converting a Mustang two-door coupe into a convertible.

Shown are three stages to lowering the convertible top of a 1980-’82 Mustang CABRIO by Automobili Intermeccanica, and the hard hatch cover that hid the fabric roof. Pictured in the lower image are the subframe tubing and steel plate, plus steel rods inside the windshield frame, all of which added strength when converting a Mustang two-door coupe into a convertible.

Forty-three years ago, there was much excitement surrounding the debut of the all-new 1979 Ford Mustang. This was the fifth styling interpretation of the original 1965 Mustang, and still captured the long hood and short deck persona of the original.

For 1979, Mustang now featured crisp, hard-edge lines that not only improved the looks of the pony car, but also made it more aerodynamic. In addition, the new Mustang was bigger inside and out than the previous Pinto subcompact-based Mustang II of 1974 to 1978, as the 1979 Mustang now shared the new and larger Fox-body platform with other Ford models.



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