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What makes a racetrack exceptional? Is it an F1 or NASCAR racing event? There isn’t a simple solution. Specific characteristics, however, distinguish some racing tracks from others. Some courses are known for consistently giving the maximum thrill and excitement, regardless of the motorsport activity. Others base their claim to greatness on their contributions to racing history over time.

There’s a reason why some tracks are famous for decades while others are popular for a short time and then fade away. Legendary ones are thrilling to drive and transform racers into legends. There are several famous race tracks to choose from when it comes to renowned race tracks. However, we’ve put together a list of what we consider the best racetracks on the globe. Do you agree?

The Autodromo Nazionale di Monza

The Autodromo Nazionale di Monza hosts one of the most memorable races on the Formula One calendar. Because of the long straights, Formula One vehicles spend 80 percent of their lap time at full speed. Furthermore, they attain top speeds of around 200 mph (320 km/h) at least four times during a single lap. For this reason, the track is known as ‘The Temple of Speed.’ The Monza Circuit was created in approximately 110 days in 1922, making it the world’s third purpose-made racetrack. In September of that year, a week after it was officially proclaimed open, it hosted the Italian Grand Prix.

Seven-time Formula One champion Lewis Hamilton set a new record for the fastest lap in Formula One history in 2020, clocking a time of 1:18.887 at an average speed of 264.362km/h (164mph). Apart from Formula One, the Monza track hosts the International GT Open, the FIA World Endurance Championship, and the W Series Championship.

Mount Panorama

While the bottom end is at best boxy, the length of the track, the ascent to the summit, the spectacular series of bends across the mountain, and the race down the hill make Mount Panorama one of the circuits that drivers all over the world consider one of their bucket-list must-drive circuits.

Following Mike Burgmann’s terrible death in 1986, the inclusion of “The Chase” in 1987 could have been regarded as detracting from the incredible Conrod Straight, but it enhanced it. At 300 km/h (186.411 mph), that right-hand curve is one of many breathtaking sights in motorsport. The crest at “Brock Skyline” at the top of the mountain, which offers a blind turn curving immediately after the drop-off, is terrific in a road car at 60km/h (37.2823mph), and on TV in a V8 Supercar, so imagine the thrill and challenge it presents to those who drive for a living.

Spa-Francorchamps

Spa-Francorchamps is unquestionably the best racetrack in Europe and one of the most accessible. Spa, nestled in the Ardennes woodland, weaves its way through a configuration that has been significantly altered from its original path. Spa, which was once a terrifying 14 kilometers (8.6992 miles) long, is now a little over 7 kilometers (4.3496 miles) long. Still, it is one of the few circuits in the world that has not been entirely neutered by a significant modification.

The current Spa retains much of the flavor of the old circuit in a more controllable and less dangerous shape. Indeed, the open downhill hairpin at Bruxelles and the tight, double-apex left following it at Pouhon became legendary corners due to the alteration. However, the Eau Rouge/Raidillon complex continues to draw all the attention with a gradient that you have to see to believe.

Nurburgring Nordschleife

The ‘Green Hell’ is a classic circuit with a long history in motorsport, with 154 bends and a length of 21 kilometers (13 miles). It continues to host events and incorporates every form of turn imaginable. It’s even possible to drive it yourself!

Road America

Road America is a racetrack located south of Green Bay, Wisconsin, that hosts all major North American racing series, including NASCAR, IMSA, and IndyCar. It has a couple of ridiculously long straightaways and is still a driver’s favourite worldwide.



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